Home dialysis: a lifeline

  1. To make the most out of present: I used to think of all the things I couldn’t do, what my life was like before this, and what it could be like after a transplant .The reality is that I could be waiting years for a transplant and lose invaluable years of my life that I won’t get back. I am restricted, but I can do some things that my health permits, without putting everything on a list for the future.
  2. To try not to worry about factors outside of my control: I can’t heal my organs, and I can’t change when a transplant will be available for me. Naturally a serious illness takes its toll on mental health and I have bad days as well as good days. But I find it easier to focus on worries that are in my control e.g. setting up my dialysis, my diet, exercise, and work.
  3. To ask for help when I need it: it is easy to try and soldier on alone and not want to bother others with your problems. But it is surprising how many people are willing to help when asked, and a strong support system makes a difficult journey a lot more bearable.
  4. To see the big picture of what I have to be grateful for: when I was at A&E with 2% kidney function in April 2020, I did not know if I would make it out of hospital or not. Over a year later I have been able to recover at least a portion of normality in my life. I am grateful to be alive and to be able to do many things.

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